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MANSFIELD
66/67 ALL ABOUT
MANSFIELD
bedJayne's reviews are in and she's calling her publicist Ted to say she's very happy about them!

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Original caricature by Jeff York of Jayne Mansfield and Anton LaVey from the new documentary MANSFIELD 66/67.

“Too delicious to ignore!” Austin Food Magazine

THE DIGITAL FIX
"This highly intelligent documentary is a wonderfully weird watch, and while dressed largely in pink and fluff, it has a lot to say about the expectations placed upon women, and doesn't take itself too seriously, much like the woman at the heart of its soul. Mansfield 66/67 is an entertaining exploration about the lasting impact of myth and the rise of the women's movement. A film full of fun, love and admiration for the underestimated blonde bombshell, who was original, self-reliant, determined, and fabulous, and appeared to live her short life to its fullest."
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BLU-RAY.COM
"It’s quite a story and, thankfully, quite the movie as well, emerging as more of an elastic collection of media and interviews that study the wonders of Mansfield and mystery of LaVey, trying to capture the irresistible camp of the pairing and pick out whatever reality existed between them."
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HISKIND
"The wildly enjoyable MANSFIELD 66/67 plays out like a delirious hot-pink fever dream."
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THE GUARDIAN
"American film-makers P David Ebersole and Todd Hughes have created an unorthodox account of the world of Hollywood gossip and illusion."
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DAILY MAIL
"The documentary has other odd touches befitting its subjects wild life, such as breaking into bizarre interpretive dance scenes without warning."
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INTO
"Their colorful, camp approach to the subject of Mansfield embodies her legacy better than any straightforward documentary ever could. Mansfield 66/67 defies convention, much like the star herself."
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WE ARE CULT
"MANSFIELD 66/67 is a gloriously entertaining exploration of the lasting impact of myth, the rise of the Feminist movement of the 1960s and a celebration of ‘the first reality TV star’."
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VANITY FAIR
"Strange and unbelievable as it may be, this one deserves a little shelf space in the memorabilia shop inside your mind."
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INTERVIEW
"Mansfield emerges as a sympathetic figure."
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LOS ANGELES TIMES
"It’s not an intimate portrait of the woman, but a celebration of the sex-positive, taboo-breaking image she created for herself and the way she rocked American culture during a hugely transitional moment."
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HUFFINGTON POST
"It is a lovely introduction to the quirky Hollywood star who influenced everything from burlesque and drag to punk rock and whose tabloid-friendly lifestyle anticipated the current era of reality show madness. "
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LOVERBOY MAGAZINE
"This whole film is scrumptious, I’ve got a great big crush on it."
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USA TODAY
"Ebersole and Hughes smartly use Mansfield's story, and her connection to LaVey, to ask universal and timely questions about cultural and societal expectations placed on women...Beyond all of the shocking stories, eye-grabbing headlines and secondhand rumors, MANSFIELD 66/67 is something incredibly important right now — believe it or not."
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VICE
"The perfect Halloween treat"
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ANIMATION WORLD NETWORK
"Mansfield Documentary Evokes Classic UPA ‘Toons."
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ROLLING STONE
"Due personaggi tragici (comici) che mostrarono, involontariamente, la natura rarefatta del culto della personalità, e in quanto a idolatria Hollywood e i culti religiosi non sono molto diversi."
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LOGO
"Pulpy and playful"
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AUSTIN CHRONICLE
"A radical take on the tropes of “documentary filmmaking” and a deconstruction of Mansfield’s insatiable hunger for attention, via interpretive dance."
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THE FARSIGHTED
"If a film about a gorgeous Hollywood starlet who enlisted the help of Satan and Anton LaVey to better her life but ultimately died tragically amidst some looming questions sounds like something you’d like, find a way to see this film."
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THE WOW REPORT
"Mansfield 66/67 isn’t just a trip into Hollywood legend, it lays out a cultural shift in how Americans viewed feminism."
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TROUBLE CITY
"This documentary is a blast."
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EL CORREO GALLEGO
"Hughes and Ebersole orchestrate a bacchanal of souls where the satanic LaVey and Jayne Mansfield switch from the crude sensationalism of the lurid crime press to the pink panther dance of cartoons."
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NIGHTMARE ON FILM STREET
"Is there anything more delectable than a Blonde Bombshell making deals with the devil? Bring on the Gossip!"
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ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY
"See the creation of a camp sex bomb in Mansfield 66/67."
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CINEMA SENTRIES
"I’ve never seen interpretive dance used as a storytelling tool in a documentary before, but somehow it fits right in with the 'kooky bombshell meets devil worshipper' theme."
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AUDIENCES EVERYWHERE
"Here is a film that embodies the actress it’s honoring. To quote Bowie: “Wham, bam, thank you ma’am!"
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WHY SO BLU
"This week we are easing into the soon to be inundated indie scene with seven new flicks that may provide some fun, fright and fights – and that’s just the Jayne Mansfield doc! This boisterous and enjoyable doc on dame Jayne Mansfield would have no doubt been given a thumbs up by the campy on-screen sex symbol if she were alive today."
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DREAD CENTRAL
"The film shows how sensationalism and the desire to live in infamy led to a tragic death that, ironically, became more famous than her storied career... A great metaphor for the entire decade of the Sixties: tumultuous, fame-obsessed, and violent."
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EDGE MEDIA NETWORK
"This oddball movie is wickedly funny and will be loved by anyone who prefers their cinematic treats as weird as hell."
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BIRTH. MOVIES. DEATH.
"Though serious contemplation is given toward what Mansfield and her uninhibited sexuality represents to 20th century culture - popular culture, sexual culture, feminist culture - the film is never above being a little weird and silly. It’s a tone befitting its subject, a subject who might well fade from our general awareness if not for loving, quirky tributes such as this."
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THE INK & CODE
"The mixture of film clips and the love with which the interviewees discuss Mansfield make it easy to see how she captivated so many. Ebersole and Hughes hook viewers immediately. If you don’t want to run out and watch all her films afterwards, something much be wrong with you. There isn’t a better celebration of Mansfield than what’s presented here."
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THE ESTABLISHING SHOT
"Mansfield defined her era’s sexual ideal the same way that Kardashian does her generation, flaunting a cartoonish sex appeal and larger-than-life figure. It makes this new movie not only a fascinating study of history but a relevant editorial on how fleeting and shallow fame can be in Tinsel Town. No matter what the decade."
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CULTURE CRYPT
"You know you’re in for an unusual experience when MANSFIELD 66/67 starts by summarizing Jayne’s entire life in a 30-second song sung by a quartet that includes a bearded man in a blonde woman’s wig... It couldn’t be more fitting for such a wonderfully weird story to be creatively captured within such a wonderfully weird movie."
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FORCES OF GEEK
"P. David Ebersole and Todd Hughes, the team behind the excellent documentary HIT SO HARD about Hole drummer Patty Schemel, bring you the last two years in the fabulously extravagant – you can’t make this up – world of Jane Mansfield."
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HORROR BUZZ
"MANSFIELD 66/67 is the ravenously delectable documentary that explores the blonde bombshell’s tragic death and the rumors that swirled around her relationship with Church of Satan founder, Anton LaVey... The result is a clever blending of fact, romanticized fact, and salacious rumor that sings a paean to the beguiling blonde and her renegade lifestyle."
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RUE MORGUE
"Was there a curse on legendary screen sex kitten Jayne Mansfield? That mystery is explored in an exclusive excerpt from the new documentary MANSFIELD 66/67."
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BACKSTAGE
"Jayne Mansfield was a Hollywood starlet who is probably better known today for her gruesome death than any of her acting roles. A new documentary, MANSFIELD 66/67, explores the last two years of the actress’ life and addresses bizarre rumors that she was killed by a curse after a dalliance with a Satanist."
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MORBIDLY BEAUTIFUL
"Quirky, tongue-in-cheek, and morbidly humorous ... filmmakers Todd Hughes and P. David Ebersole openly admit that the majority of their film comes from rumor, hearsay, and tabloid press clippings. This fun, unique approach makes MANSFIELD 66/67 entertaining, and the fact that a lot of the footage is intercut with animations and musical numbers only adds to the amiable appeal."
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366 WEIRD MOVIES
"Approaches the documentary genre from left field. "
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KILLER REVIEWS
"The folks behind this documentary are just the right sort of people for the job. In actuality, this film is far more grounded in reality than one might expect from its premise or promotional material."
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SCREEN ANARCHY
"Simply put, there is no shortage of fun ways by which this film engages with its audience."
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HOLLYWOOD REPORTER
"A bright and bouncy primer on the short, chaotic life of ill-fated sex-bomb Jayne Mansfield."
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INDIEWIRE
"‘Mansfield 66/67’ Trailer Examines Jayne Mansfield’s Interest in Satanic Rituals and Her Untimely Death"
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SCREEN DAILY
"The film represents, for all its lurid jazziness, a serious attempt to get beneath the surface of the Mansfield myth."
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HORROR TALK
"A fascinating glimpse at what might be Hollywood’s most colourful period."
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SIGHT AND SOUND
Ten of the best at FrightFest 2017
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POV MAGAZINE
"It’s a fun, bubbly adventure that captures Mansfield’s appeal."
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BLOODY DISGUSTING
"Extraordinary."
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CINEMA AXIS
"Works perfectly! It is a treat."
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EYE FOR FILM
"Part-documentary, part-performance art piece, everything is very pink."
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FILM DE CULTE
"Mansfield 66/67 ne met jamais de côté la fantaisie et ne se prend pas au sérieux, mais parle sérieusement d'une icône, pas seulement du cinéma mais de la culture américaine, une Aphrodite des 60s so hot she's banned in hell."
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FLICK FEAST
"Marvellously camp and fascinating."
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JB SPINS
"There is plenty of true-enough dish to make anyone’s head spin."
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QUEER GURU
"Bizarre and totally fascinating hybrid of a film. "
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SAN FRANCSICO BAY TIMES
"Shrewdly edits film clips...as well as news footage, animation, and even interpretive dance, to provide an entertaining story of Mansfield’s glamour and tragedy."
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SCHOKKEND NIEUWS
"Dat alles resulteert in een vermakelijke en doortastende documentaire die gaat over onze obsessie voor onwerkelijke iconen en de bijna mythische verhalen die zij inspireren."
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SCI FI NOW
"A postmodern hall of mirrors."
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KIM NEWMAN WEBSITE
"It’s a freewheeling documentary that goes off on all sorts of entertaining tangents."
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REVIEW BYAL
"It is fascinating."
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MOVIE RAMBLINGS
"An enjoyable romp around rumour and conjecture from a range of sources."
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DANGEROUS MINDS
"As if sex, violence, and black magic weren’t enticement enough, will you look at the talent! By God, I feel that old itch in my popcorn hand."
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THE HOLLYWOOD NEWS
"Visually, it’s a delight; the colour-palette is vibrant and pulpy and there is an energy to the bright, lurid aesthetic."
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© Walter Fischer
from the book CALIFORNIA INFERNAL


MANSFIELD 66/67 is about the last two years of movie goddess Jayne Mansfield’s life and the speculation swirling around her untimely death being caused by a curse after her alleged romantic dalliance with Anton LaVey, head of the Church of Satan.

This is a true story…based on rumour and hearsay.

synopsis

2017 marks the 50th anniversary of Jayne Mansfield’s fatal and legendary car crash, yet we still are left to wonder: was her life spinning out of control in the last two years of her life, or...did the devil make her do it?

Even knowing how the story ends, who could resist cheering for Jayne Mansfield (the king-sized over-the-top punked-out Marilyn Monroe who became the ultimate atomic-era sex-kitten-gone-berserk) as she navigates the cultural and spiritual landscape of a quickly changing world in the mid-1960s?

Defined by her hunger for publicity, on the one hand Jayne was Hollywood Babylon made flesh, with five kids, three messy divorces, and a lurid death that may or may not have been caused by a Satanic curse. On the other hand, she had perfect comic timing, 163 IQ, spoke five languages and was outspokenly anti-war, making her impossible to categorize, though the headlines that her wild life inspired certainly tried: Can A Sex Siren Be A Good Mother, Love Goddess With A Jinx, the Smartest Dumb Blonde...

And then there was her reported affair with Anton LaVey, head of the Church of Satan. The handsomely devilish Anton started his “church” with a publicist and preached a live and let live lifestyle. “If you’re going to be a sinner, be the best sinner on the block,” said Anton and that was music to sex-positive Jayne Mansfield’s ears. Unfortunately, her then-boyfriend lawyer Sam Brody was sent into a jealous rage and desecrated sacred Satanic talismans in Anton’s lair, prompting a curse to be put on his head that he would die in a car accident within a year. In 1966 and 1967, Jayne and Sam proceeded to have seven fender benders and near-fatal smash-ups until the one that tragically took both of their lives in a bizarre crash where reporters said alternately Jayne was either beheaded on impact or wig-scalped.

Welcome to MANSFIELD 66/67, a true story based on rumour and hearsay, where classic documentary interviews and archival materials are blended with experimental dance numbers, performance art and animation, elevating a tabloid tale of a fallen Hollywood idol into a celebration of the mythical proportions of a true original.

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newslinks

  • Hollywood Film shoot gives students and staff their first professional film credit
  • ‘Mansfield 66/67’ Trailer Examines Jayne Mansfield’s Interest in Satanic Rituals and Her Untimely Death
  • IFFR: Stray Dogs picks up Jayne Mansfield documentary
  • Rotterdam Write-Up
  • The Reprobate
  • Jayne Mansfield doc heads to America
  • Frameline Write-Up
  • The WOW Report by Trey Speegle
  • backstory

    by P. David Ebersole & Todd Hughes

    As children growing up in America in the 1960s, we both had heard the story of Jayne Mansfield, the beautiful blonde movie star who was decapitated in a horrific car accident while her children slept in the back seat. Todd remembers his mother telling him that the actress was dabbling in black magic, and that she had been a nude altar at Anton LaVey’s Church of Satan in San Francisco. True or not, these stories conjured up forbidden images of the naughty adult world of swingers. David’s mother was deeply involved in sixties feminism and the end of the era of the blonde bombshells carried a whole different connotation. So, with or without the added layer of LaVey’s roguish brand of Satanism – a playful Hefner-esque Playboy After Dark dabbling in the dark side – Jayne’s life and death proved to be a mutual obsession for us...offering insight into the changing world we lived through as young men. If our parents were formed by their rejection of the picket fence lives of the 1950s, ours were shaped by the way in which that generation insisted on breaking down societal norms and constrictions. Jayne’s uneasy intersection with that moment of American history meshed perfectly with our common interests in people who live as outsiders, especially those who experience a questioning of faith and how that expands an acceptance of mans’ multiplicitous nature, be it expressed in sexually adventurous behavior or non-traditional paths in life. All very heady thoughts when you are talking about an alleged affair between a woman known best for having the body measurements of 40-21-35 and a man who liked to wear plastic devil horns and a red cape to impress girls! But such is the wild world of Jayne Mansfield because everything Jayne naturally feels larger than normal life.

    Together, for close to twenty years now, we have researched and collected Jayne and Anton literature and artifacts trying to piece together this mysterious story as a narrative feature script. And in that time, of course life happens, so we made other projects including our first non-narrative project HIT SO HARD, about Patty Schemel, the drummer of Courtney Love’s band Hole who ended up homeless on the streets of Los Angeles. After the success of our next documentary ROOM 237 (which we executive produced), a film exploring subjective interpretations and perceived meanings of Stanley Kubrick’s film THE SHINING, we were next tapped by superstar Cher to tell her family story in DEAR MOM LOVE CHER for Lifetime. Three films in, we decided we may indeed now be documentarians, and so why not tackle the story of Jayne and Anton that we remained so fascinated by as a documentary?

    But we found ourselves not very interested in the “simple” idea of making a exposé where we were might try to dig past the rumours and legends to expose the absolute truth, but rather found ourselves fascinated by creating a celebration of the storytellings and spectacles which have ingrained themselves into the lore and accepted truths of Hollywood Babylon. For instance, although it has been disproven many times, many people today still insist that Jayne Mansfield was decapitated, preferring to hold on to the gory hearsay in lieu of accepting the reported facts. Why? What is more interesting about that which may not be true but lives on in the collective unconscious?

    First, we set out to interview subjects with not just first hand experience of either Jayne or Anton, but hopefully people who might hold deeper thoughts about either or both of them and/or their alleged relationship with each other. Much like how we stayed away from anyone directly involved with Stanley Kubrick in our ROOM 237 documentary because the interest was in the obsessive nature of the subjects more than in proving whether or not what they said was “true,” here we likewise did not interview family on either side in hopes of keeping the conversation about the way in which a story like this lives with the audience, who is less interested in proof per se and more interested in what it means to them to believe it.

    We reached out to find contemporaries who may or may not have been their colleagues, artists who expressed being influenced by one or the other, theorists and feminists who might have a take on it all, film scholars who could put their careers into context with each other, experts in Hollywood gossip -- essentially a melting pot of people who could only comment on what they heard rather than who could, say, confirm the veracity of the stories being told.

    On an artistic level, we felt that telling this as a “true story based on rumour and hearsay” required that we created our supporting material in the same vein. This is what inspired us to use what we call emotional dance numbers and experimental film and performance sketches to ruminate and try to understand the extraordinary circumstances which lead up to Jayne’s tragic death.

    Further, in lieu of recreations, we attempted to blur the lines of realness by having over fifty actors and dancers portray Jayne in various fantasized interpretations of her life. This approach gave us the freedom to create imagined nights on the Sunset Strip, secret meetings between Jayne and Anton, conflicts between her lovers, and even whimsical period animation to illustrate two key moments that otherwise only live on in memory and retellings of events in her life circa 1966/67. The idea is to “explode” what might be called the usual documentary approach, all in an effort to explore the psychology of the changing times and the mythology of the larger culture through the story of Jayne and Anton, to envision ourselves into the head space of these, in our opinion, early pioneers of enlightened thought and revolutionary behavior.

    Borne out of our long and fruitful collaboration with cinematographer/producer Larra Anderson, we were able to achieve this fever dream of an idea through a unique collaboration with Leeds Beckett University’s School of Film, Music & Performing Arts and The Northern Film School. As luck would have it, when it came time to explore these ideas and film them into reality, Larra and her university were able to invite us to come as visiting artists-in-residence. The school provided The Ebersole Hughes Company the opportunity to work with their faculty and students (over 100 participants in all) as part of what we are happy to say turned out to be a very successful research project for the renowned Yorkshire institution.

    And thus, MANSFIELD 66/67 was made!

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